- FINANCIAL SUPPORT -

The SEED Foundation is a 501c3 organization specifically geared to reach university and high school campuses. It is primarily supported through earmarked portions of dues and volunteers from the OK Business Ethics Consortium as well as generous private donations such as those made by the Masonic Fraternity of Oklahoma, Enterprise Holdings and Express Employment Professionals.

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- 2016-2017 corporate donors ($2,500) -

- 2016-2017 Vision donors ($15,000)-

- 2016-2017 grant donors (>$20,000) -

FAQ's

WHAT IS AN ETHICS BOWL?

An Ethics Bowl is a collaborative yet competitive event in which teams analyze a series of wide-ranging ethical dilemmas. Responses are judged according to the quality of a team’s reasoning and how well team members:

  • Organize and present their case
  • Attend to and analyze the morally relevant features of the case
  • Anticipate and preemptively respond to commentary and questions

An exciting tournament, an ethics bowl is a great way for students to deepen their understanding and appreciation of interesting ethical and philosophical issues.

WHAT TYPES OF TOPICS ARE DISCUSSED?

High school ethics bowls typically utilize case studies most obviously relevant to young students, such as questions concerning cheating, plagiarism, peer pressure, use and abuse of social media, privacy, relationship responsibilities, and the like. However, political and social issues — free speech, gun control, and eco-tourism — and bioethical issues, such as cloning, parental consent, and stem cell research, are also of great interest to teenagers, and are sometimes included.

HOW COMPETITIVE IS AN ETHICS BOWL?

Although the event is competitive, it is intended to promote collaboration.  Teams do not have to take pro/con positions; in fact, they can agree with each other.  They are not required to refute each others' points, but rather are asked to offer commentary on one another's arguments.  Teams are coached to not think in terms of “beating” the other team by out-arguing their opponents, or to try to score points through rhetorical or semantic fine points. Rather, they are encouraged to arrive at whatever seems to be the best answer together, through informed, civil dialogue.

In addition, many bowls award not only the winners, but also first- and second-place runners up, as well as several honorable mention awards for such areas as teamwork, best responses during the “commentary” portion of the round, and best responses to judges’ questions.

HOW COMPETITIVE IS AN ETHICS BOWL?